83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Forum for those owners restoring a Fairline.
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Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Thu Oct 05, 2017 2:02 am

Adding to the post above, I'd like to talk a little more about the experience of coming back to the Lower Mainland in 4-7 foot seas. I'm fortunate in that I'm not inclined to fear or anxiety, so I view situations like I faced on Monday as a challenge, and quite frankly, fun. I was able to use my senses and reasoning ability to the max once I realized that conditions weren't getting any better the further out into the strait I was.

Here's what I learned. Boats are small. Compared to the sea our vessels are puny. No matter how much power you have, rough seas will make a slowpoke out of you. Don't panic, panic will kill you. Letting the boat do its boat thing (bob up and down in the waves) is better than 'punching through' waves that are higher than your deck. Heading down into a trough without being off the perpendicular by a good degree will bury your boat. The first 5 things I've mentioned are now self-evident truths in my mind since I've experienced them first-hand. I never thought that hitting a trough head on would be a good idea, so I didn't.

I also discovered that my primary source of weather information wasn't good enough. When I was fully out into the strait, equidistant from my origin and my destination, the coast guard put out a storm warning for my area. I thought that I might avoid the full brunt of the weather by going around Bowen Island, but I then heard that Howe Sound had issued a gale force wind warning, so I didn't venture there. Instead I turned away from the wind, since I had to tack upwind and ended up west of my course and the wind was blowing toward the east, and I discovered that I could stay inside of a couple of waves and surf to my destination.
I ran just a little faster than the wave speed, maybe a knot, so that I was climbing up the back side of one wave and sliding down the front of it after cresting the thing. I've read that that's not so smart, but it was fun. The speed on the gps was over 17 knots average. The wind must have been 30 or more, but it was behind me and pushing me exactly where I wanted to go.

I've found an Environment Canada website that described the conditions of that day to a tee. It had a 24 hour archive too, so I pored over the entries relating to all of the areas I had just motored through, and it was accurate. It will be the primary source of marine weather information from now on.

And I'll keep my radio on Channel 16.
Gyula Huszar
 
Posts: 44
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Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Thu Oct 12, 2017 1:45 am

Here's a heads up if you have DPS drives. Volvo has 'upgraded' the D series props and now sells the I series. I've called The Prop Shop in Washington and they say they've had nothing but problems with the I series, and I guess that is because the blades break off, since one did off of mine. The thickness of the blade is much reduced on the I series, and that must be why they can't take the strain. I will now have D series props on both sides and both will be the D4s. The Is were I3s and had a shallower pitch. Hope to save fuel.

I am now going to reseal my hatch with some Wurth brand joint and seal sealer. I've removed it from the boat so that I can do the best job possible. The glass shop next to me seemed kind of averse to doing it, so it's up to me once again. I'm going to prep the surfaces carefully and spray some etching spray on the immediate area, masked off, and that should give the sealant a good surface to bite into. JMHO. Can't be worse than what's there now.
Gyula Huszar
 
Posts: 44
Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2016 12:35 am

Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Fri Nov 03, 2017 1:45 am

"I ran just a little faster than the wave speed, maybe a knot, so that I was climbing up the back side of one wave and sliding down the front of it after cresting the thing. I've read that that's not so smart, but it was fun."

So, I've done a bunch of 'internet research' about what causes capsizing and I found out why it is that what I did that day is 'not so smart'. It seems that when you are popping over the crest of a big wave under those conditions the props and drives might come out of the water, and that besides the engines being in danger of overspeeding and grenading, control will be lost, as in all control. The boat will probably slew sideways presenting the side of the boat to the next wave coming in, and that could do it. It'll happen in a few seconds of course, so unless providence is on your side that day you'll probably have a very bad day, maybe your last.

The subject of capsizing was so interesting that I read for a couple of hours and thought about my personal experiences and juxtaposed them with the experiences of others. One thing that was worthy of note was that life jackets not only act as flotation, they could also act as a protective garment to keep the wearer from bashing about inside the boat and hurting themselves. Didn't think of that one. Another great suggestion was having an 'Oh SHIT!' bag that could be snatched up in the case that getting off the boat was necessary. It should have the usual goodies in it, like a waterproof VHF radio that floats and has a gps transmitter, flares, flashlights (that float), airhorns and whistles. And a mirror. Just another bunch of things to get for the voyages to come.
Gyula Huszar
 
Posts: 44
Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2016 12:35 am

Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Thu Nov 09, 2017 1:55 am

Now that I'm somewhat experienced as far as what's going on with the mechanicals, electrical system, steering gear, props and stuff like that, and because I've crossed the Salish Sea and experienced poor weather firsthand, I'm feeling pretty good about my chances of making port and returning unharmed.
It's a better feeling than the anticipation of doing something inherently dangerous for the first time and surviving the experience, although the exhilaration of knowing you'll be seeing another sunrise is hard to beat.
To add to my already impressive (to me) knowledge of seamanship on Playmaker I attended and passed the radio course over the weekend. I'm now licensed to ask for such things as weather updates, a slip for the night and to call for assistance. Here's something to consider; if you need help because your boat's sinking or on fire or something else that would cause you to abandon ship, you'd like to be rescued as quickly as possible. If you're able to transmit your position, nature of your emergency, number of people needing rescue and other such pertinent information to a coast guard station before deboating you'll be plucked from the jaws of death sooner than if they don't know where you are or if you should need assistance at all.

So, for the next part of my 'project' Fairline upgrade I'll be investing in a radio with a 'panic' button (transmits position until it's no longer able), a buoyant hand-held vhf radio with gps, an 'EPIRB' mounted to the boat which automatically deploys and transmits a distress signal with the particulars of the vessel and the location should it be immersed in the water. Next I'll be conducting 'man overboard', fire and deboating drills with my better half. She's always with me wherever the boat goes. She's already learned how to drive and dock the boat, just in case. Can't be too prepared.
Gyula Huszar
 
Posts: 44
Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2016 12:35 am

Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Murv » Thu Nov 09, 2017 8:31 am

Well done, sounds like you're really getting to grips with everything, can't be too prepared, as you say!
Murv
 
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Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Thu Nov 09, 2017 6:07 pm

Thank you, Murv, for your kind comments. It's good to know someone's reading my posts, and hopefully someone will twig to some comment of mine that causes them to prepare themselves or their boat better than they otherwise would have. As I posited at the beginning of this thread, "every seasoned boat is a bit of a project", and lots of older boats like mine are bought by people with stars in their eyes and limited knowledge and capability, like me. I've always been of the opinion that the only way to truly understand something is to 'stick both hands into the guts of it and swish them around in there'. I'm fortunate in that I'm a mechanic with his own shop, have 61 years of life experience, and have a healthy respect for the vagaries of machine integrity and the unknown. As I go along, learning, planning, experiencing this new universe that is boating I realize more and more that our youth have been cheated or insulated from learning how to learn, taught that you should do nothing until directed by someone else. It's a huge pity.
Gyula Huszar
 
Posts: 44
Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2016 12:35 am

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