83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Forum for those owners restoring a Fairline.
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83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Thu Dec 01, 2016 2:10 am

I suppose every 'seasoned' boat is a bit of a project; my new acquisition is no different. I got it a week and a half ago, and I've already replaced the risers (5 years old), fixed the wiring to the starboard engine starter, got the radio (entertainment) replaced, and so on. I've got to fix the fuel gauge (no responses to my plea for help on another forum), but I'm a mechanic and I have a plan. I'll get it sorted.
It was repowered with twin fuel injected 5.7 l. gasoline engines and Volvo duoprop outdrives were put on to complete the drive systems. I've got 640 h.p., so I figure I'll be able to get it up to 80 kmh. at full throttle. The previous owner said he wouldn't go faster than 60 kmh because of fear.
Is there anything (besides deadheads and wood) that I should fear? Are these hulls stable at speed?
My performance figures are based on this article;
http://www.boatingmag.com/boats/shoot-o ... s-cruisers

And since mine is a little shorter and a little narrower, but with the same drivetrains, I figure I can't be too far off.
Gyula Huszar
 
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Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Mon Dec 05, 2016 6:46 pm

Was out yesterday on a beautiful December day in Burrard Inlet, and the boat got skittish at 3200 rpm and the trim was way too much a part of the attitude algorithm. I was going over 60 kmh at that point, but being new to the boat I backed off the throttles due to operator logic. Besides, there was wood in the water and some of it was bigger than necessary to sink my boat. I'll try again when conditions permit. I guess it's better to be overpowered than under in any case.
Gyula Huszar
 
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Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Mon Jan 09, 2017 8:26 pm

Well, the gas gauge is working now. The sending unit had to be replaced; unfortunately for me, the sender is on top of the tank but below the floor in the front of the salon. Just to the left of the helm chair. Luckily for me, the builders of the boat used marine plywood as a floor material, and screwed it into place, and then put a coat of epoxy? fibreglass? on top of it all.

I dug the epoxy? fibreglass? out of the ends of the screws when I located them and unscrewed them from the framing, and I was able to take up a sheet about 4'X4' which exposed the tank. Then it was a simple matter of getting a sender that offered 33-240 ohms of resistance and adjusting the length for the tank's depth, which was 22". The dimensions of the tank are 48"X48"X22" deep. This offers an 828 L. (182 imperial gallons; 219 u.s. gallons) of capacity.
Gyula Huszar
 
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Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Wed May 03, 2017 8:04 pm

Well, another fun weekend working on the boat. I replaced the coolant hoses coming from the heat exchangers, and the salt water hoses were in particularly needy condition as they were crunchy to the application of pressure. The exchanger outlets were still thick enough; next year I'll replace them. I put in 4 new marine batteries and lo and behold, the trumpet horns started working! I had cleaned all the terminal ends of the wiring to the batteries and I guess that's where the problem lay. I changed the coolant after flushing the blocks with G11; a superior coolant used in VWs, BMWs and Mercs. It's quite inert and in all the applications I've used it in there has been no further deterioration of the hoses or anything else in the cooling system. It's dense too, so it has a great coefficient of heat transfer, and that's the primary concern when you're talking about coolant.
Electron transfer from the coolant through the rubber coolant hoses is what causes the majority of coolant hose deterioration. G11's pretty much electrically inert, so I won't have to change the hoses again in 2 years. Maybe never! I used Greenline Marine exhaust rated hose all over and that stuff is incredibly durable.
Now I'm looking into getting a boathouse for my baby on Friday. Fingers crossed!
Gyula Huszar
 
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Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Tue May 09, 2017 3:03 am

Well, my days cleaning the boat are going to be sharply limited from now on; I got the boathouse! No more mussel shells from industrious birds blocking my drains! I may even sleep better from now on. And that chalky finish from weather and sun; a thing of the past. One good wax job ought to last me for ages from now on. I'm also liking the idea of putting unnecessaries away in the house, only to be brought on board if needed (prawn and crab traps; tender; fishing gear (I really didn't know how much 'stuff' comprises fishing gear, whew!)

Here's a tip I've just learned from firsthand experience yesterday. If the chain jumps up from the windlass, as new as it is, the anchor will hurl itself to the bottom and empty the chain locker. Bad day if that happens. Luckily, I was on the bow watching the chain colours indicating the amount of chain in the water, and I'm fairly big so I stomped on the whizzing chain back into the cutouts in the spool and I stopped it from doing a nasty. Always learning new and exciting things. Also, the outside windlass controls on the bow on my boat are on the deck and foot operated. I managed to step on the 'down' control without knowing it and I didn't know why my buddy was 'operating' the windlass from the inside station when I frantically indicated that he should stop. My bad.

Lesson learned. Learn everything you can about the boat. Also, I think that making sure that the anchor has a tether or a means of staying attached to the boat other than the chain over the windlass will keep the thing on the boat and not self-deploying. "Anchors aweigh" and not "Oy veh! The anchor's away!"
Gyula Huszar
 
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Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Tue May 09, 2017 3:59 pm

Well, this is embarrassing. I was in the boathouse yesterday evening checking it out when it became apparent that every boat owner has to know how to swim. Also, it's advisable, nay, necessary that some measure of physical fitness is required by a proud boathouse owner as well. How do I know this, first hand? I fell into the water since the boat wasn't in the boathouse yet and the boathouse is comprised of a lot of water area and not a lot of walkable area around the water area. Hence the 'know how to swim' caveat. The physical fitness caveat comes from the need to be able to pull yourself out of the water when the platform is two and a half feet above the water's surface without so much as a toehold anywhere. I used the cleat for a handhold and and an adrenalin rush to yank myself out. It's amazing how difficult this is when you're 60 and you weigh 270 lbs. soaking wet. And I mean soaking wet. Of course, I did this all by my lonesome.
At least I know that the cleat is securely fastened. Small comfort. I hope my new Iphone recovers. I got it last week, and it wasn't one of those waterproof/resistant ones. The fob for the garage door is dead, but the fob for the suv works fine! I'd call this a better than 50/50 outcome, since I'm alive to write this.
Gyula Huszar
 
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Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Thu May 25, 2017 7:24 pm

Had a great time on the boat this past weekend, and the only fly in the ointment was that the starboard engine quit 9 nm from the marina on the way back. Everything was running perfectly during the cruise back from Secret Cove, but just outside of the First Narrows the starboard engine just stopped running, which makes for interesting manoevering and relatively low speed.
I scan gauges every 15 -20 seconds and nothing was anything but perfect. In case there was a fuel line rupture I shut the key off immediately when the rpms showed zero and of course I didn't try a restart without actually checking the engine compartment for status. Being in the disturbed waters of a narrows I couldn't leave the helm to do this, so I limped it closer to the marina. Once there I figured that I couldn't manoever into my slip, so we tied up to a convenient open dock and I jumped into action. The dock was concrete with no rub rails, so time was of the essence. I jumped into the engine compartment and looked for anything that would keep me from starting the engine. Seeing nothing amiss I tried starting it. It fired a few times randomly and backfired just as often. This reminded me of what happens when the rotor is loose on the shaft. I pulled the cap and sure enough, rust had formed under the collar and split it resulting in a mobile rotor. I had another on board so I scraped off the rust with a screwdriver and lubed the inside of the new rotor collar and slammed it on. Cap back on and the engine started up just fine. Kim figured that the whole exercise took under 10 minutes.
Gyula Huszar
 
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Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Wed May 31, 2017 7:07 pm

I've got the boat 'on the hard' right now; I've pulled 3 of the 4 props, but my homebuilt nut removing tool to pull the inner prop failed on the second nut. The props came off the shafts easily, so they were properly lubed prior to installation. One trim tab ram is broken in two pieces, I'll get a couple of new ones soon. The oil in the starboard engine leg was a milky blue colour, the port leg was normal; both were full. I have to figure out how water has intruded into the leg oil and fix it. As per usual I'll be applying anti-fouling paint to the bottom and the drives need paint too. Everything mechanical feels good while turning; one prop has a little bend, not much, I'll see if I need to bring it to a prop shop or if I can plastic hammer it back into shape once I determine its malleability.
Otherwise; new caps and rotors; oil changes; seawater hoses from the legs; raw water impellers; driveshaft and exhaust bellows; anodes everywhere; serpentine belts; oil pressure gauge for the starboard engine; end caps and o rings for the heat exchangers; a spare ignition module and a new bilge pump for good luck.

Luck. Don't depend on it.
Gyula Huszar
 
Posts: 44
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Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Mon Jun 05, 2017 6:45 pm

Well....spent a couple of days working on this project. The proper vp tool helped with prop removals, I pulled off both upper and lower legs to see what might be amiss and to replace the bellows for the exhaust and the driveshaft. The gimbal bearing was seized onto the driveshaft on the port side, so I had to cut off the bellows (which is wire reinforced) to allow enough room for the gimbal bearing to exit through the gimbal housing. Once out it was a simple matter to remove the seized on bearing and polish the shaft. The leg with the milky
oil had a drain plug with a destroyed o ring, and nothing else appeared amiss, but I'm replacing the shifter seals anyways along with all the seals betwixt and between everything with O.E. parts.
Interestingly, the driveshaft bellows on the port engine wasn't clamped tight and water made it into the driveshaft area. No harm was done by this; genuine parts are probably internally sealed on the ujoints. Wiped it clean and back in it goes.
That was one day; getting it apart; on the second day I sanded and primed the outdrives. That takes a day for anyone who's interested. BTW, I'm an auto mechanic with my own shop, so I have all the labour saving equipment one could hope for. Tonight I'm applying the first coating of antifouling paint.
Gyula Huszar
 
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Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Tue Jun 06, 2017 3:13 am

Wow. I'm supposed to apply 3-5 primer coats. Just done the second. Going home now for dinner.
Gyula Huszar
 
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Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Murv » Tue Jun 06, 2017 2:04 pm

Well done! I'm surprised no-one has commented on your thread yet, but thanks for all the informative updates!
I suspect that there are very few people out there with any experience of that sort of power in a sedan 32, certainly sounds an interesting project knowing how well they go with half that power!
Some pictures would be good if you get chance, always good to see what other people are up to!
Best of luck with it, sounds as if you're going to get there quite easily 8)
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Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Sat Jun 10, 2017 5:19 pm

The legs are going back on today. Gimbal bearings; shifter seals, all other parts are finally in. The surveyor I've engaged has done the out of water inspection and found nothing of note amiss. Onward and upward.
Gyula Huszar
 
Posts: 44
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Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Mon Jun 12, 2017 8:02 am

Hi Murv, it is kind of an interesting boat because of the ridiculous amount of power for that hull. I've run it around at 25 kts and that seems to be the limit of the speed with which it feels reasonably controllable. After that things get too immediate for my liking.
There's a couple of good things, really good things actually, about having that much power and that much prop. Running on one engine is a 10 kt. exercise unless you need to go faster, which is possible. It's difficult to control, obviously, but the engine doesn't mind the load. Secondly, since the engines are always loafing along, even at 20 kts., they sip fuel (relatively speaking) and seem as if they'd be happy running along forever at 20. Getting somewhere distant is still a day trip.
I was putting the drives back on yesterday and I discovered that an internally splined drive sleeve between the upper and lower sections had twisted, not enough to see from the outside, but looking down the barrel you could see the splines jogging off. The outside of the drive sleeve had a groove cut into it during manufacture, and I'm supposing that this was done so that the sleeve could sever there if instantaneous loads were suddenly enormous. I have to get another one. Good thing that I looked.
Gyula Huszar
 
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Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Fri Jun 16, 2017 1:51 am

drives.jpg

Hope this works; I've attempted to attach the image file of the picture of my drives reinstalled on the boat. It went back in the water today and everything seems to be in order.
Gyula Huszar
 
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Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Fri Jun 16, 2017 1:57 am

playmaker.jpg


Posting the first pic made me want to do it again. This is 'Playmaker 2' up on the hard this morning before plopping it back in 'the soft?'
Gyula Huszar
 
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