83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Forum for those owners restoring a Fairline.
  • Advertisement

Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Sat Jun 24, 2017 1:15 am

I've got the report coming from the surveyor on Tuesday, but I contacted him today since he's done the inspections already and his only concerns were the propane system (not sealed from vapours) and the diesel heater (non-functional; too close to the gasoline powered engine bay). Shouldn't be insanely difficult to correct these deficiencies. He says that it's a great boat otherwise. So, seal the propane bottles in their compartment
and get rid of the heater altogether. Who needs it anyway. This is Vancouver, and boating in the winter stinks. If I feel the need I'll bundle up and suffer through. I could also rig up a heat exchanger from the engine cooling water. That might make the most sense anyway although it wouldn't heat the whole boat, only the salon.

Project for this weekend; seal up the propane compartment and glue some davits on the new dinghy. Then toodle around in it to make sure it's up to the job of saving lives or setting crabtraps. I've heard the term 'gunkholing', but it sounds weird and unenjoyable so I'm not going to use it.
Gyula Huszar
 
Posts: 32
Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2016 12:35 am

Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Wed Jul 05, 2017 2:04 am

I've got the survey done, and it looks like things are coming along swimmingly. It seems the propane system needs isolating/attention/modifying, and the battery clamps aren't ideal, but other than a number of small things the surveyor discovered nothing alarming.
This weekend it's off to Desolation Sound. It's 86 nm from here, and that doesn't sound too far, but it's further than I've ever been in the boat. I've been to Secret Cove and back (that's when the starboard engine cut out), and that's 1/2 the distance, and that distance was covered in 2 hours each way (with the last 8 nm being the slowest. I'm not counting that hour). Everyone is looking forward to the 9 day trip with relish. Bucket list stuff for me and my sweetie. I'm just glad that my body and mind are still fully functional.
Gyula Huszar
 
Posts: 32
Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2016 12:35 am

Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Tue Jul 18, 2017 7:49 pm

We all took the boat to Desolation Sound for 9 days of fun, frolic, sun and prawning. Everything worked as
advertised. The 200 nm round trip used up 920 l. of fuel, so it uses 460 l. per 100 nm. The tank holds 828 l. so it has a range (at an average 18 kt cruise) of 180 nm on a tank with 0 reserve. Not bad in my humble opinion.
With fuel costing $140/l. the fuel cost was $1288 CAD for the round trip journey.

On the way back we hit a log outside of Howe Sound that looked like it was 3 metres long. The hull took it like a seasoned champ, but I'm pretty sure we nicked a prop as I had to drop the rpm on the port engine by 300 rpm to get rid of a disturbing sound/vibration. The perils of speeding home on the last leg of a journey in waters that are known to be home to a variety of floating and semi-floating hazards. Otherwise, we're all safe and sound and looking forward to the next adventure on the water!
Gyula Huszar
 
Posts: 32
Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2016 12:35 am

Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Mon Jul 24, 2017 8:51 pm

So, this is what happens when you try to chew up a 5 metre long log with your expensive props. Osborne props says they're fixable, but it'll take two weeks to do. They only found an exact replacement on your side of the pond, and only one of the two at that. Seems to be a low production item. I put on the spare props that I bought using Craigslist that were compatible but not exact. The pitch is a bit more aggressive on the spares. I'm going to do a sea trial at the next opportunity and see if she has better performance, worse or unchanged performance at the rpms I'm used to running. It'll be an interesting and informative exercise I'm sure.
I'll also order a couple of upper to lower leg coupling sleeves and change the starboard one for sure at the next pullout. Can't be too sure.

We want to go to Saltspring Island and Maple Bay (separate trips) in the next few weeks, so I'm getting a second, larger gps chartplotter for the flybridge station, and perhaps I'll avoid the next collision. I'm going to empl0y a high intensity tablet, 10.1", with gps and glonass integral to the unit. I'd just hate to run over a charted rock or a shoal or something even more than a log. They're relatively cheap to buy, the charts are from the NOAA anyway, and some charts are populated by mariners with local knowledge of the area you're putting around in. Open source augmentation. Sounds good. I'll have my dedicated chartplotter there as the primary, but smaller, screen in the inside helm station.

I'm still on the 'project' forum since it seems that the status of the boat is an ongoing 'project'.
Attachments
IMG_0148.JPG
Gyula Huszar
 
Posts: 32
Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2016 12:35 am

Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Murv » Tue Jul 25, 2017 11:20 am

Ouch! At least they're easily repairable and you didn't suffer any drive damage.
Sounds as if you're making good use of the boat, hope the next trip out is a little less eventful!
Murv
 
Posts: 26
Joined: Wed Jan 15, 2014 3:57 pm

Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Sat Aug 05, 2017 12:00 am

I've got the props back from the prop shop; $200 later (not bad!); but I'm going to use this weekend's odyssey to Thetis Island as my 'sea trial' with the spares. If it feels weird to me I'm going to swap them over to the way it was. The spares have a more aggressive pitch, but only a little.
Gyula Huszar
 
Posts: 32
Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2016 12:35 am

Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Wed Aug 09, 2017 10:35 pm

The sea trial to Thetis Island was a success; the spare props work well, but the drive on that side must run at a lower rpm in order to achieve the balance. It's to be expected given the extra pitch on the spares. I swapped them back to the (repaired) originals at the marina on Thetis, and the motor back to home port was smooth as long as I kept the rpm on that side at or below 2400. Any more and there was an uncharacteristic drone, so I fear I've bent the shaft on the leg a tad. I'll look into who can straighten it out, if it's possible, or I'll look for a replacement. Dang logs.
As an aside, the gps failed to acquire satellites for some reason, and I tried all the tricks. I had to motor back using a paper chart, clock, compass and a whole lot of correction factors as I was going back through unfamiliar waters with my 'cheat sheet' (the notes I made prior to my departure 2 days before) and the seas were relatively rough, around 3 foot average and as high as 4 footers on occasion. I had to go off course constantly to line up with the waves as best I could, but I'd veer over to a course that was reciprocally off course the other way for about the same amount of time to generally keep my heading. I relied on my compass completely as we were offshore and the trip was 21 nm for that leg that was the worst as far as weather was concerned, never mind that we were encompassed in smoke from hundreds of forest fires in the province blowing right over our course. No visuals to ascertain our position even a mile offshore. Still, my calculations proved worthy and we ended up sighting UBC after a couple of fun hours of dealing with mother nature.

Like I said before; Luck, don't count on it. I'd like to add this; GPS, don't count on it.
Gyula Huszar
 
Posts: 32
Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2016 12:35 am

Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Tue Aug 15, 2017 5:28 pm

Hmmm.... the 'drone' sound that I heard above 2400 rpm seems to have subsided; I've run it up to 3100 for a period and it seems to be normal now. Odd, but welcome.
I anchored for the first time without the help of my more experienced buddy, and all seemed to go as planned. I picked a spot close to shore with 20 feet of water under the transom and watched as the tide went out whereupon we lost 3 vertical feet of water but the depthsounder showed 8.5 feet as that happened. 20-3 should be 17, but with only a 2 to 1 slope trigonometry put me closer to shore where it was much shallower. I pulled the anchor and was happy with the experience. I also discovered that the sounder had a programmable alarm, so I set it to 12 feet subsequent to my experience. I'm going to anchor overnight in Bedwell Bay tomorrow because it's a very sheltered bay with nearly no wind predicted and a sticky, muddy bottom. Check, check, check. Perfect for the first overnight anchoring that I did myself. I've set a stern line ashore before in Tenedos Bay and Prideaux Haven, so I've got that knocked. I'll be doing it tomorrow as well.
I painted markings on the anchor chain Sunday so that I'll know exactly how much chain is out. All you need is spray cans of rust paint of all the colours of the rainbow and a couple of garbage bags or something to protect the dock from your actions. Mine is now red for 50', orange for 100', yellow for 150', etc. As it turns out, I've got 375' of chain. Good to know.
I've also acquired a tablet as an additional navigational aid; loaded it up with Navionix and drove around up Indian Arm. It has GPS, GLONASS and BeiDou, so it acquires sufficient satellites for navigating almost immediately. Comforting. The tablet, a Samsung Tab A 8" seems to be up to the task of running around the downloaded charts, seamlessly I might add, but the processor, about 1.5 gigahertz, gets warmer than I'd like when putting it through its paces. Otherwise, I highly recommend it. It cost $200 CAD at Costco here in Vancouver. Similar sized dedicated marine nav systems are $1200 and up. Since it's a tablet, it is totally portable so I can run it on the flybridge where I previously relied on good luck and local knowledge.

Luck. Don't depend on it. Also, redundancy is good, but not if it's the reason for your imminent job seeking. Little joke there. Very little.
Gyula Huszar
 
Posts: 32
Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2016 12:35 am

Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Thu Aug 17, 2017 11:56 pm

Well, another day, another fly in the proverbial ointment. This time we were anchoring in Bedwell Bay overnight and we were awed by nature in all of it's glory, especially in the morning. Nothing could be more tranquil. It was our first overnight at anchor where it was only the two of us, and only the two of us were responsible for our boat's position.
The 'fly' part. On our way back from Bedwell Bay we were transiting over some glass smooth ocean in Indian Arm. I pushed the throttles up to about 3200 rpm and suddenly I was treated to a big vibration. My hand was on the throttles, so I throttled back instantly and the vibration went away. The gauges were good, so I pushed the starboard throttle, and no vibration. When I pushed the port throttle I knew something was wrong, bigtime. So I drove back on the starboard engine mainly, with the port engine idling along so I still had power steering. I was relegated to a speed of 8 knots, instead of 20. The good news is that we made it back without additional drama. The prop shop that repaired my prop told me that this one could not be fixed. The good news is that a prop shop in Washington has pairs of all this series of props, made up from individual props. Centrifugal force increases as the square of the increase in speed. I've been reading about some aftermarket props but the reviews were less than stellar. One fella had his 'last' two years. How does a prop wear away? I'm going to get some original equipment props, now that I've experienced the outcome of putting on repaired props firsthand and the experience of other boaters with aftermarket 'quality'.
Attachments
IMG_0168.JPG
The blade fell off.
Gyula Huszar
 
Posts: 32
Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2016 12:35 am

Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Fri Aug 18, 2017 7:18 pm

Well, took off the props yesterday on the port side and looked closely at the area where the blade came off, and I think that the little dime sized nick on that blade was repaired without being exactly balanced in terms of hydrodynamic laminar flow over the blade. That would have accounted for the drone at 2400 rpm that I experienced earlier when it was first installed after the repair. This laminar flow problem (I'm surmising here) caused a stress fracture that put it at a different attitude, thus eliminating the drone at 2400. Unfortunately, when the additional stress of putting the rpms up beyond 3200 overcame the strength of the remaining intact material at the interface between the hub and the blade, the blade came off.
I've just spoken with the prop repairman and he's told me that aluminum props are a good choice in my case because they're relatively inexpensive, light (less load on the drivetrain when changing from fwd to rev while docking), but that they are diecast and hence subject to less than ideal molecular alignments. And that's if they're made well. So now I have to decide which prop sets are best for the boat and its overly muscular engines.
Also, in hindsight, I may have pushed the throttles forward too quickly, resulting in a higher instantaneous load. I'll 'walk' them up to my desired speed from here on in. Learning all the time. I guess that 'Playmaker II' wouldn't make a good waterskiing boat.
Gyula Huszar
 
Posts: 32
Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2016 12:35 am

Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Fri Aug 18, 2017 8:09 pm

Closeup of the fracture/failure. I've found out that if your engines are over 240 hp, Volvo Penta recommends stainless steel props. Note the peripheral area that is a different colour. Looks like a fracture to me. Also, the casting seems somewhat grainy and probably not ideal as far as alloy mixture is concerned. Just my 2 cents.
Attachments
IMG_0171.jpg
Gyula Huszar
 
Posts: 32
Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2016 12:35 am

Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Mon Aug 21, 2017 9:02 pm

Again I've come up with a temporary solution for my prop perplexion. I've cut off the opposite blade so that I'll have some prop and a correct prop to match up with the bigger prop in front of it. It's better than setting out without any spares at all. My handiwork;

I took a trip to Keats Island on Sunday on top of the trip up Indian Arm on Friday, and experienced no issues. That's two trips in a row!

I filled up with gas on the leg home, and my gas gauge, which I took great pains to set correctly, showed just under 1/4 tank, a volume remaining of perhaps 200 l. The tank is 828 l. in size, so I figured I'd be putting in 625 l. and it took 621 l. Knowing exactly how much fuel you have onboard is gold. Also, knowing exactly how much fuel you use per hour at a given rpm is platinum. I use approx 80 l. / hour at 17.5-20.5 kts. (doesn't seem to make much difference, those 3 knots.) That means I'll be able to run around for 10 hours with little to no reserve. That knowledge is diamonds and emeralds. After all, as I was reminded, I had the lives of 6 people in my hands. Not good to run out of fuel or be stranded out at sea with no spare props. This boating thing carries a big responsibility with it.
Attachments
two blade.jpg
Gyula Huszar
 
Posts: 32
Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2016 12:35 am

Re: 83 Fairlane 32 flybridge sedan

Postby Gyula Huszar » Thu Sep 14, 2017 6:13 pm

Dealing with the results of the survey. I'm going to have to build a propane locker for the aft deck compartment. There's an ABYC standard for the containment vessel into which the propane cyls. will be put.
Here's a link to a website that is helpful in the sense that it specifically outlines the parameters of the installation, and it also answers many questions;
http://www.pcmarinesurveys.com/Safe%20B ... lation.htm

I've removed the open-on-the-top propane cyl holder and with this as a three dimensional template of sorts, I'm going to engage a local plastics company to build a containment vessel that meets the standards. I'm only going to put one 20 lb cyl into it to allow for the gauge/regulator/shutoff solenoid (in that specific order) to reside inside of the same container. This appears to satisfy the requirements, and the rest of the installation was already up to snuff. No copper tubes, newish hoses; crimped connections on the hoses, not gear clamps, etc. I'm also going to relocate the gas switch further away from the stove and the heater, and verify if there are propane leak detectors in the appliance area and I'll put one into the propane locker as well.

The diesel heater, an Espar, was well past its prime and I've removed it permanently. I've already done a lot of the other little things outlined in the survey, like hanging the wire harnesses in the mechanical room properly, replacing the hose clamp on the bilge pump, removing the 120v ac outlet in the engine compartment, etc, and in the course of doing these things I've improved many wire connections and hose and pipe mountings.

I look at the exercise this way; I'll have to depend on this boat completely when I'm 100 nm from home, in the ocean, surrounded by systems that could fail and fuel sources that could ignite. If I'm careful about the preparation of the boat it's far less likely that we'll have some disaster befall us. And, as an aside, because we'll be well and properly equipped, we'll be able to lend assistance to another boater should circumstances require it.

Here's a little anecdote that illustrates what poor preparation can result in. A fellow mechanic on the North Shore here has a well kept (visually speaking) wooden cruiser. He exited the marina we share and toodled into Burrard Inlet, and started out on a very local cruise. He wasn't planning on leaving the inlet. As he was crossing the inlet, a distance of perhaps two kilometers, he noticed that his speed was dropping. He pushed up the throttle and his speed didn't increase as expected. He then looked at how the boat was going through the water, saw nothing unusual, and returned to his helm. At that point he noticed that his oil pressure was near nil, and glancing at the temperature gauge he saw that it registered severe overheating. He turned the engine off so as not to damage it further, but it was too late. The damage was done.

Here's the thing. The boat had only one engine. It didn't have a kicker motor. There was no way to propel the boat, since a paddle on a boat displacing several tons (it is 10 metres long) is futile. He got on the deck and waved his arms frantically, hoping to get the attention of a passing boater. All the while the boat drifted. Luckily for him and those around him he drifted into a large metal mooring buoy. It scraped the side of the boat but at least he wasn't in the shipping lane anymore. He phoned for a sea tow and was pulled back to the marina, which has a boat lift and all facilities.

He figures, probably correctly, that he sucked a plastic bag into his water inlet and it prevented cooling water from doing its job. One could say it was unavoidable, and it may have been, but what was avoidable was the sense of complete helplessness he must have felt when he realized that he had no backup to the primary propulsion system.

Oh, yeah. I did not see a tender mounted either. Talk about helpless.

Imagine for a moment how much more dreadful he would have felt if he had been out in the strait in 1.5 metre waves when this happened.

No tender, no kicker, no low pressure alarm, no overheat alarm and no second engine. Just crossed fingers.
Even if he had turned off the engine when it was overheating there was nothing he could do about the intake blockage.

His next boat will be a more modern fibreglass boat with 2 engines and a tender. And it'll be as soon as he sells his beautiful baby.
Gyula Huszar
 
Posts: 32
Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2016 12:35 am

Previous

Return to Project Forum

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests

  • Advertisement
cron